‘Innovation and The Ripple Effect’ by the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre (SAIC) is published today – a progress report for 2014-2017.

Over the last three years, SAIC has connected companies who farm our seas with Scotland’s excellent universities – accelerating innovation, strengthening national food security and supporting environmental stewardship. SAIC has facilitated 16 collaborative projects with a combined investment of £17.9 million, delivering £3.60 for every £1 of public money.

The Ripple Effect tells the story of how working with 32 industry and 11 academic partners is making a positive impact on the aquaculture industry. 

Commenting on the report, Fergus Ewing MSP, Cabinet Secretary for the Rural Economy and Connectivity said:

“Scotland is a country famous for innovation. This report from the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre demonstrates that their work facilitating collaborations between industry and academia is already reaping rewards.

“Aquaculture in Scotland contributes more than £1.8bn annually to our economy. The optimism and potential for the future is substantial. Already businesses working across the supply chain provide high value jobs, with investment in local communities, from Shetland to Stranraer.  I’m confident that SAIC will continue to be instrumental to making that happen.”

Heather Jones, CEO of the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre shares this positive outlook:

“Working with our industry and academic collaborators, we’ve had some great successes but obviously the work doesn’t stop there.

“Innovation is imperative to progress. By connecting talent from our top class university sector with industry trailblazers, SAIC supports the ambitious growth strategy of Scotland’s fish and shellfish farmers to deliver more than £3.6bn to the Scottish economy by 2030[1], generating up to 18,000 jobs.

“Like innovation itself, the effects of our activities ripple far and wide, way beyond our own core remit. We look forward to the ripple effects of innovation extending over time to be good for the environment, good for inclusive economic growth, and good for young people in Scotland.“

To download a full copy of the progress report, please visit the SAIC website http://bit.ly/2CMu2i2

[1] http://scottishsalmon.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/aquaculture-growth-to-2030.pdf